Green Card Through Registry

An immigrant visa confers permanent resident status. This is a stamp placed in the passport by a US embassy (as with nonimmigrant visas), and which allows you to re-enter the United States to establish your permanent residence. Immigrant visa holders also have an Alien Registration Receipt Card, more commonly known as a green card or permanent resident card. (although it is now pink, blue), which is a plastic card. With your photo, fingerprints, and signature. The green card is the document allowing you to return to the United States after a period abroad. There are two ways to get a green card: through a blood relationship (or marriage) with a close relative who is a permanent resident, or through employment. Green cards are issued on a preferential basis, and this means that you may well wait several years before receiving one since only a certain number is issued each year. Immigrant visas entitle the holder to live and work in the United States (and to be free to change jobs) permanently, as well as the right to be eligible for U.S. citizenship after three years of marriage. With an American citizen, or after five years for others. The main difference between the rights of a permanent resident and those of a US citizen is the ineligibility to receive certain benefits, such as Medicaid and Social Security benefits. Green cards are valid for ten years and cannot be taken back unless the cardholder gives up residence in the United States or commits certain crimes.

Criteria for obtaining an immigrant visa/ Green card

Before you apply for an immigrant visa, you must establish that you meet the criteria for any type of visa you are applying for. If you are eligible to apply, you can apply for more than one visa category. When applying for an immigrant visa (or for some non-immigrant visas), it may be advisable to hire an immigration lawyer, although this may not always be necessary. It all depends on the case, although procedures can be complicated, and regulations change frequently. Every year, many applications are rejected because the forms are not filled out correctly, e.g. the information given is not correct, the visa requested is not the right one or the lawyer has not approached the local authorities correctly. If someone is applying for a visa on your behalf, you should at least verify that the information submitted is correct. If your application is rejected (for whatever reason), you are less likely to get a visa if you appeal or reiterate your application. It is, therefore, crucial to put the odds in your favor the first time.

Immigration lawyer

There are thousands of immigration attorneys in the United States and abroad, most of whom specialize in specific categories of immigrants, such as those with enough money to pay their fees. Legal fees depend on the complexity of the case and range from $ 250 for a simple consultation, up to $ 5,000 and $ 10,000 for a complicated case requiring a lot of work. Only get a lawyer if they have been highly recommended or have a good reputation, as there are a lot of incompetent and dishonest lawyers. Perhaps the most reliable source of information for American lawyers is the Martindale-Hubbell List, which includes a note for each lawyer. The notes can be viewed on lawyers.com. However, no lawyer can guarantee that your request will be accepted. Make sure you know how much to pay for its services and know exactly what those services include. If you want to effectively appeal a green card denial, you will likely need to hire a lawyer. Immigration agencies are also a slightly cheaper solution. There are around 400 in the United States, and some of them take no fees, like the recently accredited Boston Immigration Center

Immigrant category

The preference categories are those that have a numerical restriction (quotas) for the number of people who can enter as permanent residents in the United States. The preference categories are then divided between immigrants sponsored by their families and those who come for a job, as shown below:

The preference categories are those that have a numerical restriction (quotas) for the number of people who can enter as permanent residents in the United States. The preference categories are then divided between immigrants sponsored by their families and those who come for a job, as shown below:

Relatives of U.S. citizens and foreigners with permanent resident status (preferably called close members) are restricted. Close family (see above) is included in this number. Close members, preferably are divided into four categories:

  • F-1 (first preference): unmarried children of US citizens and their children,
  • F-2 (second preference): spouse, children, and unmarried children of a green card holder. At least 75% of all these visas are allocated to wives and children, and the remainder is allocated to older unmarried children,
  • F-3 (third preference): children of married US citizens (of any age), their spouse and children,
  • F-4 (fourth preference): siblings of U.S. citizens and their spouse with their children, if the U.S. citizen is over 21.

Immigrants sponsored through their employment are divided into five groups:

  • E-1 (Priority Workers): people with extraordinary abilities in science, the arts, education, business, or sport; extraordinary professors and researchers; certain executives and managers of multinationals.
  • E-2 (Members of the Professions): professionals who have an advanced diploma or a baccalaureate followed by at least five years of progressive experience in their sector; people with exceptional abilities in science, the arts, business, e.g. professors or researchers.
  • E-3 (Professionals, skilled and unskilled labor): professionals who have a baccalaureate; skilled workers with at least two years of professional experience; other workers with hard-to-find skills.
  • E-4 (Special immigrants): special immigrants, which includes religious workers and priests; employees of certain international organizations and their immediate families; Specially qualified current and non-current US government employees; residents are returning home.
  • E-5 (Investors): People who create jobs for at least ten full-time Americans (not counting family members) by investing capital in a new US-based company. The minimum amount of capital required is usually $ 500,000. 

In addition to the quotas for each category, there are limits on certain subcategories which are calculated according to formulas subject to annual changes. 

The Registry Immigration is a section of immigration law that allows specific individuals who have been physically present in the United States since January 1, 1972, even if they are currently illegal in the United States to apply for a Green Card (Permanent Residence). The United States.

The Registry Immigration is a section of immigration law that allows specific individuals who have been physically present in the United States since January 1, 1972, even if they are currently illegal in the United States to apply for a Green Card (Permanent Residence). The United States.

You may be eligible to obtain a Green Card (Permanent Residence) through the Registry if you meet all of the following conditions:

 

  • Entered the United States before January 1, 1972
  • You have continuously resided in the United States since you entered
  • He is an honest person
  • You are eligible for naturalization (citizenship)
  • You cannot be deported under section 237 (a) (4) (B) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA).
  • It is not inadmissible under section 212 (a) (3) (E) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA) nor is it criminal, involved in human trafficking, immoral, subversive, a violator of the narcotics law, or foreign smuggler.

To register for Green Card through the registry immigration, you must submit Form I-485, Application for Registration of Permanent Residence or Adjustment of Status.

  • Entered the United States before January 1, 1972
  • You have continuously resided in the United States since you entered
  • He is an honest person
  • You are eligible for naturalization (citizenship)
  • You cannot be deported under section 237 (a) (4) (B) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA).
  • It is not inadmissible under section 212 (a) (3) (E) of the Immigration and Naturalization Act (INA) nor is it criminal, involved in human trafficking, immoral, subversive, a violator of the narcotics law, or foreign smuggler.

You must submit the following documentation along with Form I-485:

 

  • Two passport photos
  • Copy of a government-issued photo ID
  • Copy of birth certificate
  • Copy of the passport page with the Non-Immigrant visa (if applicable)
  • Copy of the admission stamped passport page (if applicable)
  • Form I-94, Arrival, and Departure Record (if applicable)
  • Evidence of entry into the United States before 1 January 1972
  • Proof of uninterrupted residence upon entry into the United States

 

Note: An individual applying under the Registration process does not need to undergo a medical examination.

By having a pending Form I-485, you can request authorization to work in the United States and advance parole (advance parole to travel outside the United States and be admitted upon return).